Thanksgiving … is a daily condition

Most family people who also have children and grandchildren can relate to the state of being thankful. It’s actually pretty easy to be thankful if your life is good and your kids are doing well also.

T and I watched our parents at this age live with grace and dignity. I often tell my siblings who missed seeing our mom grow through her 40s, 50s, and 60s that they missed the best of her in many ways. I’m thankful that our children and grandchildren met her there too.

But most successful people also learn to be thankful for the balance that comes with the inherent challenges of living. Jazz musicians often call this the blues. These blues help us grow toward realizing those good times. We have found that good times simply result from many years of positive effort being rewarded in some cool tangible context. We’ve seen this in our children’s and grandchildren’s lives as well as in our own.


Our Children and Grandchildren help give us perspective.

During a conversation the other day, T and I decided that one of the coolest aspects of this stage and life is that we’ve lived long enough to have already had a significantly positive impact upon the lives of other people. Our children. Our grandchildren. Our friends. Our colleagues. As well as the general people of those communities where we have been fortunate to make our home over the years as a family.

A relatively recent photograph of me with my sons and grandsons

Micah is now the age I was when I retired from my active duty military career after 22-years of continuous service. Lorri is now the age I was when I was selected for the special assignment as the First Sergeant of the Student Company at the Armed Forces School of Music in Norfolk, Virginia. Seth is now the age I was when I was selected for the special musical assignment with the NATO Band in Naples, Italy. Ethan is now the age I was when I chose to go to the Army band at Ansbach, Germany where Terri and I first met. Ariana is now the age I was when I was accepted to the Army Band Group Leader Course at the Armed Forces School of Music. Owen is now the age I was when I got serious about music and practicing the saxophone. Avery is now the age I was when my father was still active duty Air Force and we still lived at Kincheloe Air Force Base in the Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan Air Defense Sector. Hayden is now the age I was when I got my first “big boy” hair cut.


As Parents and Grandparents we still learn from our kids.

When our children first left home as young adults our instinct was to protect them as we did when they were children. We didn’t know any better and had to learn how to be parents of adults. Over the years we’ve (or rather I have) learned to trust what they were taught and trust they have practical common sense. Over protective to a fault sometimes.

Our daughter Lor, our son Seth, and our two youngest grandchildren

I will add to this parental transition and growth was my own personal distrust of most people in our society and nation as a black man. Yes, that sounds really awful considering everything positive and wonderful that I have been part of and have done throughout my life and career. But, since everyone has something to confront, this issue has been part of the deal of me becoming who I am in a more mature form. Reconciling contradictions is the essence of life after all. And it’s often a challenge for others to understand we are all works in progress no matter how old or experienced.

Our daughter Lor, our son Seth, and our two youngest grandchildren

The cool thing about being a grandparent is that you can look at your children and grandchildren and they will show you that you won life. You ran the table. They help you realize that you already have everything you need. Yes, our children and grandchildren taught us that. Even that littlest guy who seems to have lost total patience with the photo shoot.

We are truly thankful everyday.

promises, promises …

always a better jazz mousetrap

Kansas City Area Youth Jazz (YouthJazz.us) recently finished our 2020 season. This was our second season, and like the 2019 debut season, it was again very successful – despite 2020 being contracted from our normal 4-months to 2-months, largely due to the coronavirus pandemic safety restrictions and protocols that continue at this writing.

2019 Kansas City Area Youth Jazz season recording
session set at BRC Audio Productions, Inc.
2019 Kansas City Area Youth Jazz season recording
session set at BRC Audio Productions, Inc.

Kansas City Area Youth Jazz (KCAYJ) is a private jazz education program that was conceived in 2010 to fill a void that existed in this arena back then, but for various reasons it was not formally launched until 2019. It’s a unique program in that KCAYJ is designed to be a “youth jazz artist experience” rather than a variation on the summer jazz camp model. See our story at this link, it’s pretty interesting how things came together.


lifelong jazz artist + jazz educator

Historic Photograph: The 2009 Kansas Bandmasters
Association Convention (Wichita) with Mr. Leon A. Brady.

Upon returning home to the Kansas City area to live, I connected with people on the scene here who became friends and mentors. Particularly, Ahmad Alaadeen as my last great applied jazz saxophone teacher and the legendary Leon A. Brady who invited me into his youth jazz program as the woodwind faculty in 2007. Mr. Brady founded Kansas City Youth Jazz in 2000 and it grew into five big bands comprised of over 100 students in grades 6th through 12th. His was a unique model in that we faculty would conduct sectional clinics before the bands rehearsed the music together as a full ensemble. Needless to say, doing this made for really tight ensemble work and the band directors could work at a more refined level than simply “fixing notes.”

Historic Photograph: 2011 shaking hands with Mr. Brady after
his final concert and retirement from his program.

I immediately noticed that the students could not improvise very well. It was likely so glaring because the ensemble work was so tight and sounded so good. I asked Mr. Brady for permission to start a combo lab after the Saturday morning rehearsals were finished at 11:30 and he approved. I started with one combo and that quickly grew into two combo labs – the 11:30 and 12:30 combos. A fellow faculty member, Jason Goudeau joined me and we taught the students basic song forms and how to deal theoretically with common chord progressions found in jazz music.

12:30 Combo performing at the Madrid Theater in Kansas City

The students began playing coherent improvised solos and the program thrived. So much so that I was invited to present the Kansas City Youth Jazz 12:30 Combo and give a clinic at the Kansas Bandmasters Association Convention (Wichita) with Mr. Brady in 2009.

11:30 Combo during a performance in Kansas City

This was a promising generation ago now. These young musicians are now adults. Several have gone on to graduate from top music schools and conservatories, become music educators, professional military musicians as well as scientists and business people. I have been successfully and effectively teaching music since the 1980s. In addition to my private studio practice, I have actually taught jazz at the college-level. I enjoy working with middle-level and secondary school music educators, but have never been a public school band director myself. They are indeed my musical heroes.

Jay McShann Musical Memorial February 2007 – Gem Theater KANSAS CITY | Playing lead with 18th & Vine Big Band after Bobby Watson left – I actually got to meet Mr. McShann and interacted with him several times before he left us. That’s my last great applied jazz saxophone teacher, the late, great Ahmad Alaadeen on tenor.

art is about doing good business

2020 FELLOWS (ARC) – digital album

In addition to all of the things the combo program taught youth jazz artists, Kansas City Area Youth Jazz teaches that art is about doing good business. Most of the act of doing good business happens away from your musical instrument and the stage. It is arts administration. It’s planning and developing programming. It’s customer service. It’s keeping promises to your art, your fans, your band members, and the people who believe in your ideas and dreams. Promises. Keep them.

2019 FELLOWS (ARC) – digital album and limited edition heavy vinyl LP album
2019 Kansas City Area Youth Jazz Fellows after their recording session in August 2019.

promises, promises …

We kept a big promise today to those wonderful people who supported the Kansas City Area Youth Jazz program during its very first season. Yes, even before we were an established entity with the successful track record we have established in two great seasons. Your vinyl LP albums are in the mail to you. They sound superb and Bill Crain took the time needed to ensure that the music on this album will genuinely merit repeated listens. You’ve got a “collectors’ item.” Thanks again! All the best, Mr. B

They Call It Retirement… But, Is It Really?

We, in the USA, have traditionally mostly worked until a certain age range between 62 to 72 and then we typically retire to a terminal vacation status. That was literally the tradition for the generation before our late Baby Boomer cohort.

We both have decided to “retire” in July 2020. And we are very happy about this decision because it has come by our own choice. Our lives will not change drastically in the sense of most activities. We will simply now be our own bosses. That’s pretty cool.

We both have worked almost literally our entire lives, having had jobs since we were teenagers, having served in the active duty Regular Army as professional musicians, and having engaged successful careers as educators, as well as having worked in both federal government and corporate settings too. We’ve always been entrepreneurs.

We both made a point of subsidizing our art as musicians with day jobs that afforded a good living for our family but didn’t detract from our primary calling as artists. It was a difficult balance to maintain at times. However, we have always seemed to find synergy in this regard throughout these years.

We are going to enjoy this next phase of life and look forward to the opportunities it will bring. It’s going to be cool engaging the music-related projects we have established over the years, and the unlimited positive possibilities of our nonprofit organization.

We plan to golf, bowl, walk, and enjoy our ornamental gardening activities. We plan to visit our family and friends while engaging cultural sites around the USA.

We plan to visit our musical friends in Europe again and enjoy interacting with other people throughout the world as artists and humans. We hope to visit England (UK), Germany, Italy, France, Spain, Portugal, Greece, and Austria among other places.

And of course, there is the music. It was our mutual love of music that literally brought us together those decades ago. We plan to continue creating, practicing and teaching lots of music going forward.

Retirement? No, “next chapter.”

Milestones – New & Old

Milestones (new = Columbia Records CL 1193 ) is a modal jazz composition written by Miles Davis. It appears on the album of the same name in 1958. It has since become a jazz standard. Milestones (old = Savoy S3440-42-43 + S3440-41-43b) is also the title of a bebop standard credited to Miles Davis that pianist John Lewis had written for him while playing with Charlie Parker. (Wikipedia)

a.k.a. “Milestones (new)”

Milestones (New)

Milestones (CL 1193) is a studio album by American jazz trumpeter and composer Miles Davis, recorded with his “first great quintet” augmented as a sextet. It was released in 1958 by Columbia Records. Tenor saxophonist John Coltrane‘s return to Davis’ group in 1958 coincided with the “modal phase” albums: Milestones and Kind of Blue (1959) are both considered essential examples of 1950s modern jazz. Davis at this point was experimenting with modes – scale patterns other than major and minor. In a five-star review, Allmusic‘s Thom Jurek called Milestones a classic album with blues material in both bebop and post-bop veins, as well as the “memorable” title track, which introduced modalism in jazz and defined Davis’ subsequent music in the years to follow. Andy Hermann of PopMatters felt that the album offers more aggressive swinging than Kind of Blue and showcases the first session between saxophonists Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley, whose different styles “feed off each other and push each musician to greater heights.” Jim Santella of All About Jazz said that the quality of the personnel Davis enlisted was “the very best”, even though the sextet was short-lived, and that Milestones is “a seminal album that helped shape jazz history.”The Penguin Guide to Jazz selected the album as part of its suggested “Core Collection”, calling it “one of the very great modern-jazz albums.”


BURNETT FAMILY MILESTONES

1979 – 1988

Always Home

Our Last Week in Germany

Our first home together as a family was in 1979 while living in Germany. We have made several houses our home over the years. But our home has never been a structure. We’ve learned that our home has always been with each other. We rented a very nice small apartment in the Wiesner family’s house located in the quaint village of Sachsen bei Ansbach. We enjoyed going to our own home after performing, working, and touring with the Army band.

PAIDI Baby Room Furniture

Our son was born at the US Army Hospital in Nürnberg during the time we lived there. We selected all German-made furnishings for our apartment too. Our son’s bed was made by the company, PAIDI. It was modular and could be configured to a crib as well as a toddler bed. This period began our enjoyment of the art of homemaking and family life in general. Our daughter would also use this very same bed. We eventually passed that PAIDI bed on to a military couple who had a baby and was in the Army band with us in Missouri a half dozen years later.

Fort Leonard Wood Military Base Housing Then

We lived in the housing provided to us as an active duty military family and made each place a very comfortable home. During this period when we lived on post, you could customize the inside of your government quarters, and do basic landscaping of your yard, but nothing more. We put in carpet, ceiling fans, our own furnishings, and we even built a pretty cool stone patio at one place too.

Fort Leonard Wood Military Base Housing Today

Other than mowing your lawn and shoveling snow from your walkways, the maintenance was done by government housing workers. Today, military base housing has been contracted out to firms who have built new units and remodeled many of these historic properties that often dated back to the World War II Era. From what we’ve observed, the Military Housing of today is not much different than any other high quality affordable middle-class housing units found in the private civilian sector. That’s cool.


1988 – 2001

Establishing Roots

We built our first custom home in 1988. It was a really cool split tri-level ranch on about 3/4 of an acre of land and built by one of the best home builders in that community surrounding the military base where I worked with the Army band. This was not typical of most active duty military during those years. We were only able to actually build this home because the Army kept us stationed in the same place for so long. We were just in our early thirties. Many of our peers and contemporaries outside of the active duty military service life had already been living in their own homes for many years by then. Our children were just 8 and 6 years old respectively when we moved in. They literally grew up in that home. We made many family memories and naturally had some individual developmental adventures living there. We ultimately moved back home to the Kansas City metropolitan area to engage professional musician activities after our children grew up and left home to build individual autonomous lives as adults.


2001 – ONWARD

The Healing House

Transitions of any type are ultimately major disruptions to family life in terms of establishing roots in a community. Military families in the music field of our era experienced lots of moving. So, most of us could count on pulling up roots so often that buying a house wouldn’t have been practical. Our family had moved every 2-3 years until we got to that Missouri assignment and ended up being posted there so long. The only other people we knew who usually bought homes while still serving were those who were assigned at the school of music or the Military District of Washington and special command bands for literally their entire careers. And as empty-nesters, we moved back to my native Kansas City area and didn’t really know whether living here would be a good fit for us or not. So, we rented, before we bought our first home in KC – a ranch with a “vibe” and “spirit” that was regenerative to the point that we still lovingly call it “The Healing House.” We’ve found that you never really know where the last part of your working career will take you in preparation for those golden years everyone talks about. When we found KC was truly our home again, we decided to sell that home and build our Burnett Family forever home.

Forever Home

In 1998, I wrote an essay for a publication where I spoke about the various phases of life a person could likely go through. The first twenty years in your parents’ home. The next twenty years leading a family with your own children in your home. The next twenty years using the first forty years of experience to impact your community positively. And the next twenty years are basically about doing whatever your health, desires, and vigor will allow. We don’t think most people actually “retire” in the sense of not doing anything anymore, but work on passion projects well into their 80s and beyond. We’re in our fourth vicennial. It’s even lots cooler living it than we thought it would be when I wrote that article back then. Anyone who isn’t motivated about getting here and beyond in age and life should be.


Milestones (new = Columbia Records CL 1193 ) is a modal jazz composition written by Miles Davis. It appears on the album of the same name in 1958. It has since become a jazz standard. Milestones (old = Savoy S3440-42-43 + S3440-41-43b) is also the title of a bebop standard credited to Miles Davis that pianist John Lewis had written for him while playing with Charlie Parker. (Wikipedia)

a.k.a. “Milestones (old)”

Milestones (Old)

This is Miles Davis‘s very first recording session as a leader in 1947, with Charlie Parker playing tenor saxophone, rather than his normal alto saxophone voice (Session 7). Why is Parker on tenor sax? Herman Lubinsky at Savoy Records concluded that since Miles is the leader on the session, the record must not sound too much like those made with Miles as a sideman. Miles Davis All-Stars, Recorded August 14, 1947, in New York City for Savoy Records. Tracks: “Milestones,” “Little Willie Leaps,” “Half Nelson,” and “Sippin’ at Bells.” Artists: Miles Davis (trumpet), Charlie Parker (tenor sax), John Lewis (piano), Nelson Boyd (bass), and Max Roach (drums).



Featured photograph in this post is one in a series taken in 1979 by Terri Anderson Burnett using her 35 mm Olympus OM1 SLR camera. Subject matter is various images of the Weisner family’s rose garden in the yard at our home on Am Hang Straße in Sachsen bei Ansbach.

Parenthood is forever …

Our mother, Vi Burnett said something to me once about her family and us children that I continue to find to be subtly insightful.

“You don’t know what type of people you are raising. You just do your best and hope life doesn’t hurt them too badly that it dampens their spirit.”

— Mom Burnett

She also often quoted the adage that our children are only “on loan to us for a few years.”

But the thing that really stuck most of all is when she said that “you will never forget the times when all of your children were still living in your home.”

I understand her context much better now that I am the exact age she was when she said that to me in the 1990s. And, it’s true.

It’s not that you want to smother your children and keep them from engaging their own lives. It’s that you miss the times and when you finally figure out what you are doing, your kiddos are gone. It’s both beautiful and melancholy at once.

The goal of parenthood – bringing people into the world who didn’t ask to be here – is to nurture positive contributors to this world.

In hindsight, I can say we have done that in parenting both our son and daughter.

We’re equally proud of both of them as kick-ass adults and just as in love with them today as we were on those days we respectively met each of them in their delivery hospitals.

Spring Break Projects

spring = rebirth + renewal


PROJECT #1 – STUFF: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

My professional recording debut was in 1979 as a soloist with the Hof Symphony Orchestra in Germany.


Hof Symphoniker

Our Army band jazz ensemble performed Concerto for Jazzband and Symphony Orchestra, the 12-tone serial work by Rolf Liebermann, and I played the alto solo. I was still just 22 years old.


Hof Symphony Orchestra Rehearsal – US Army Public Affairs Office Photograph (1979)

In 1984 the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command put together an audio sampler for recruiting musicians. Our young family of four had moved back nearer to my home and lived in Missouri by then. So, I was playing lead alto and touring 8-states in the midwest USA with the 399th Army Band jazz ensemble. It was a very good band. Two of our “live recorded concert” selections were chosen to be included in “An Army Bands Sampler.”



We are in the beginning stages of some major spring cleaning and I came across the latter cassette in relatively pristine condition.


#familymuseum #cassette #analog


PROJECT #2 – DINO MASSA 2020 KC TOUR

Italian Jazz Pianist and Composer, Dino Massa

I met Dino Massa during my tour of duty with the NATO Band based at Naples, Italy. Dino was a masters student at the Naples Conservatory at the time and we used to play jazz gigs during my off-duty hours when the NATO Band was not touring. We reconnected via social media several years ago and resumed our musical collaboration with Dino traveling to Kansas City to perform concerts, master classes and record.



We released “Echoes of Europe” worldwide on the ARC label in 2017 to great reviews. It’s a very nice recording and special in that me and Terri (flute) are performing together again on most of the selections with Dino and several of my closest musical friends and colleagues on the KC scene. This year Dino is coming to perform a concert in Kansas City, teach a couple of master classes at a high school and college, then we’ll record another album for the ARC label.



We are recording original music and the theme for this recording project is inspired by the work of various impressionist artists


DINO MASSA 2020 KC TOUR GALLERY

MARCH 2020 IS WOMEN IN JAZZ MONTH IN KC

The 2020 Dino Massa KC Tour was a wonderful success. Maestro Dino conducted two master classes. Thanks to the Music Departments of USD 453 and KCKCC for having him interact with your students. Dino performed at Westport Coffeehouse Theatre with a quintet of KC artists and thanks to everyone who made it. And the recording session at BRC Audio Productions in Kansas City was very nice as well. We have another very fine album of original compositions for release on the ARC recording label.


LHS MASTER CLASS


KCKCC MASTER CLASS


WESTPORT KC CONCERT


BRC AUDIO PRODUCTIONS RECORDING


The featured photo is the Castel Nuovo, a.k.a. Maschio Angioino, a seat of medieval kings of Naples, Aragon and Spain

One Family + One Tribe


#BlackHistoryMonth 


Thanks to Nicole and Danae at the Dwight D. Eisenhower VA Medical Center‘s CPAC where Terri Anderson Burnett works for inviting me to speak for one of their “Black History Month” events.

I gave a talk and presentation centered on the topic African Americans and the Vote and enjoyed learning lots while doing the research for this opportunity.

A couple of years ago, I spoke at their “Martin Luther King Jr. Day” event. 

BLACK HISTORY MONTH


One Family

I enjoy discovering new facts while doing research to give talks, presentations, and even music clinics. What I learn each year during Martin Luther King, Jr. and African American recognition periods is always enlightening.

Having added “Papa” and “Nana” (grandfather and grandmother) to our monikers, we’ve now actually lived lots of significant and interesting “history” ourselves.

Ultimately, we’ve found that despite the inherent issues and myths within human society, the fact is that there is only one race – the human race. We are one family.


One Tribe

According to a Harvard study, music is indeed the “universal language.”

This and other contemporary studies reinforce my beliefs in this regard as well.

No matter where we’ve visited or lived in the world, we were able to communicate with others through the common bond of music. That’s cool.


VISION 20/20


#MissouriMusicEducatorsAssociation #Clinician


On January 24, 2020, I had the honor and privilege of sharing research and methods with my colleagues and peers at the annual Missouri Music Educators Association In-Service Workshop Conference. Sponsored by MMEA and Conn-Selmer, Inc.

T went with me and we had a pretty good time together as well.

MMXX

January 2020 marks several milestones.

Obviously, the start of a new year, but also the concluding of another decade.

The “roaring twenties” …


ELIZABETH TOWER

A.K.A. “Big Ben” – London, United Kingdom

2020 also marks 5 years since our family trip to London, UK.

It was cool and we went on several day trips with our adult children.

Many photographs in this post are from that winter vacation.

We love them and are so proud of each of our children.

They have not only grown into adults to emulate, but each one is a truly brilliant person who contributes greatly to society.

And, most importantly, they are good resilient souls.

They don’t quit or give up.

She’s looking at him …
He’s looking at her …

OUR NEXT DECADE TOGETHER

2020 also marks the year we will turn 65.

We actually don’t know what turning 65 is supposed to feel like yet because this year is our first time doing it.

But we collectively know we’re blessed with good health, the love of our family + dear friends, we still have our chops, and still play our instruments at a professional-level – so we are very thankful.


Music Is Life Is Music

Photo by our daughter

+ Recording

+ Performing

+ Teaching

+ Composing

+ Studying

Teaching + Community Wind Ensemble + Flute Choir

Happy MMXX to you and yours!

Time Flies indeed …

CHEERS!

Music + Books

“Life is a journey, not a destination.”

–Ralph Waldo Emerson

WINTER VACATION BREAK

“PROJECT #45”

OUR OFFICE BOOKSHELF = “BEFORE”
OUR OFFICE BOOKSHELF = “AFTER”

“You can’t use up creativity.

The more you use, the more you have.”

– Maya Angelou

Every year since we have been together, we have had a “winter vacation break project.”You know this type project. Yours probably could even be one like our office bookshelf and office storage space morphed into. It’s something that you plan to get around to doing, but never do during the course of the year because you can find what you need in the immediate and are able to get done what you need to get done despite there being no organized system in place to facilitate efficiency and accountability.

BUT . . . WE TRULY ARE ORGANIZED PEOPLE . . . REALLY WE ARE . . .

We decided to use the old reliable BANKERS BOX®
as our primary storage and retrieval vehicle .

 “The greatest sign of success for a teacher . . . is to be able to say, ‘The children are now working as if I did not exist’ . . .”

– Maria Montessori

Nonetheless, it never fails that we find a better system or more logical process to use somewhere in our day-to-day living that helps out tremendously.

And it seems that during the course of simply living, while continuing to learn and grow, we will periodically find that old systems and methods are no longer functionally useful.

THE LIBRARY OF A COUPLE OF ACTIVE PROFESSIONAL WOODWIND MUSICIANS

“The principle goal of education is to create men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done.” 

– Jean Piaget

We use everything in our office bookshelf space as part of our business activities, woodwind studio teaching practices, and individual studies as professional musicians.

So, in our experiences, such resets are usually a good thing.

SOME HISTORIC ITEMS + JAMES R. FUCHS AND CHARLIE MOLINA

THIS IS THE ACTUAL KLOSE METHOD I PRACTICED AND STUDIED CLARINET FROM – COST: $7.50 VALUE: PRICELESS

“It isn’t where you came from, it’s where you’re going that counts.”

– Ella Fitzgerald

I started playing a band instrument in the 9th grade, which is still late by most standards. In addition to the cursory learning to play some rudimentary form of the recorder, I studied the violin in the 4th grade growing up in Paola, Kansas. Yes, Paola, Kansas. However, I participated in private music programs at our church and had pretty good general music classes during grade school and junior high.

THIS WAS MY SOLDIER’S MANUAL AS 02Q4C1
WOODWIND GROUP LEADER WITH ARMY BANDS

“Tell me, and I forget. Show me, and I remember. Involve me, and I understand.”

– Chinese proverb

Mr. Jim Fuchs taught me clarinet and saxophone. I played clarinet initially and then essentially played the saxophone from the 10th grade onward. Paola had its own music store in town back then too. That’s how I first met Charlie Molina, who was one of the owners and a Conn Clinician. I auditioned and successfully passed auditions to qualify for the military music programs of both, the Army and Air Force. I chose the Army.

THESE COURSES WERE PART OF THE ARMY’S ONGOING
INDIVIDUAL PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

“I’m still learning.”

–Michelangelo

*The main photograph of this post is from our family trip to England during Christmas time – exactly 5 years ago on this date. All other photographs are during the work.

Love never fails

Our late mother Vi Burnett was a major inspirational force to me, my siblings, and many others as well. I often think of the things she used to say at times when a situation brings her voice forward in my thoughts. Thus, she is quoted often in our family blog.

PHOTO: Mom’s apartment in Paola, Kansas – 2006

Mom Burnett was a renaissance womaneven before using the word ‘renaissance’ to refer to someone who had figured out most of the handles of their life was cool.

In the latter years of her working life, mom went back to playing the piano. Having had private piano lessons as a child, picking it up again was not an issue for her.

Mom eventually held the position as church pianist at St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church where we attended during the years after our family had settled back in her paternal hometown of Paola, Kansas. A minister of music.

That church no longer exists and most of the living descendants of that wonderful church community from our youth no longer reside in that city. But it remains significant to me because it is where I got my start in music singing in the youth choir. I eventually added woodwind instruments at school and mom encouraged me.

Our family attended Sunday school and church every week growing up, went to summer Vacation Bible School classes, participated in seasonal programs produced by the church, etc. We continued these type traditions with our own children too.

Admittedly, we have learned over the years that such faith is ultimately a personal choice, – but we sincerely believe in and live by Christian principles, pray in good times and bad, and over the years have learned that family is not always limited to people who are related to you by blood.

We have a great foundation.

Living it is not just about going to a church on Sunday.

It’s about Love.

Loving one another.

The Burnett Family branches made up of our children and grandchildren add another dimension to all of this.

We are blessed to have so much love in our lives …

L – O – V – E

“TRICK OR TREAT! – Colonial Williamsburg.
Hey, there’s OWLETTE – from PJ Masks

Love is patient, love is kind.

It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud.

It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs.

Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth.

It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.

Love never fails.

1 Corinthians 13:4-8

“The Nana Tour” – Highlights Gallery

2019 Nana Tour